Old Tulips :: Report of the Tulip Nomenclature Committee, 1914-1915: Class 9 - Broken English Tulips
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Report of the
Tulip Nomenclature Committee, 1914-1915
IV. DESCRIPTIONS OF GARDEN TULIPS.
CLASS IX.—BROKEN ENGLISH FLORISTS' TULIPS.

Return to: Home Page of the Report of the Tulip Nomenclature Committee, 1914-15..

[For General Classification see p. 9. Names in italics are synonyms. The date of flowering given below and the duration of the flower are for the year 1915 and represent the order in which the varieties may be expected to flower rather than the exact date of flowering, which will vary from year to year; it will also vary according to the source and time of planting of the bulbs. The dates are taken, as a rule, from bulbs which had been grown for two years at Wisley and had been planted at the same time. The heights are measured from the same bulbs and are relative only.]

Table of Contents for Broken English Tulips


a. Roses.

In the broken flowers two types of marking are recognized for exhibition; in the one (feathered) the marking colour is pencilled on the edges of the petals only, in the other (flamed), in addition to the feathering on the edges, the petals carry a central beam of colour which branches and merges in the feathering. (See p. 58.)

Aglaia (Lawrence).—Tall; long cup, well marked with deep dull crimson on a yellowish ground, which soon bleaches to pure white. Feathered form unknown; 24 inches; May 8, 17 days.

Andromeda (Walmsley).—Dwarf; cup longish and egg-shaped; stem weak. Finely feathered with bright rose on white, but base always cloudy; 18 inches; May 10, 15 days.

Annie McGregor (Martin).—Beautifully marked with scarlet on a clear white ground; generally flamed but occasionally feathered. The best roze tulip; 18 inches; May 9, 18 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Mabel (Martin).—Rather taller than Annie McGregor. Strongly marked with deep rose on a clear white ground, finely flamed and sometimes feathered; 22 inches; May 6, 19 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Modesty (Walker).—Sometimes finely feathered with bright rose. Base yellow on opening but bleaches. The markings are too generally scratchy and indefinite. Early and increases freely.

Mrs. Collier (Collier).—Dwarf; stem rather weak; good cup, late but opens freely and soon loses shape; well feathered. One of the most reliable feathered roses.


b.. Bybloemen.

Adonis (Headley).—Well marked with deep purple on a white ground, a little lacking in brilliancy; good constitution, increases freely; 26 inches; May 10, 15 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Bessie (Hepworth).—Early, dwarf. Fair cup, but easily opens flat; deep purple markings, often rather characterless, on white ground. Fair constitution, but does not increase freely. Valuable for exhibition only in the feathered state. An attractive garden flower; 18 inches; May 8, 17 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Chancellor (Battersby).—Tall; flower opening only on a bright sunny day"; base very pure, marked purple, but the beam is paler than the feather.

Duchess of Sutherland (Walker).—Medium height. Cup longish, with outer petals standing apart. Well marked with bright purple on brilliant white ground. Good constitution, but increases slowly; 20 inches j May 7, 18 days.

Elizabeth Pegg.—Sometimes beautifully feathered with deep purple, more generally flamed with shades of purple, grows well and increases freely, but rather tender to frost; 24 inches; May 8, 17 days.

George Edward (Scholefield).—Medium height, short cup of great substance. Base rather doudy. Heavily flamed with deep purple on a clear white ground. Early and lasts well.

Queen of the May (Hepworth).—Late; below medium height. Rather pointed petals, stout and lasting well; boldly marked with dark purple on pure white ground. Sometimes produces a fine feathered flower; 20 inches; May n, 16 days.

Stockport (Hepworth).—Dwarf, early; stem rather weak; feathered lilac on a pure white ground; a good flower for exhibition.

Talisman (Hardy).—Tall, beautifully marked with purple black on a fine white ground, bold black anthers. Good constitution and increases freely; 24 inches; May 10, 15 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Universe (Dymock).—Below medium height. Large cup, form good, well marked with rich purple on a good white ground. Base generally very small. Fair constitution; 20 inches; May 10, 15 days. Formerly known as ' King of the Universe."


c. Bizarres.

Colbert (Slater).—Dwarf; good cup, dark chocolate markings on rich yellow ground; scented; best when feathered; 18 inches; May 7, 17 days.

Dr. Hardy (Storer).—Beautifully marked with warm red-brown on brilliant golden-yellow ground; fine constitution, increases freely. One of the three best Bizarres, stands well under ordinary garden cultivation; 23 inches; May 10, 15 inches. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

George Hayward (Lawrence).—Tall; large cup of good shape and substance, though the petals are narrow and open too widely in heat. Rich red-brown markings on a brilliant golden-yellow ground, sometimes very fine. Good constitution; grows and increases well; 25 inches; May 8, 17 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

James Mclntosh (Hepworth).—Tall, late; good cup, well-feathered chestnut on a rich yellow ground.

Lord Frederick Cavendish (Hardwick).—Tall, long flower, outer segments pointed; well feathered with red-brown on a good yellow ground. ' Attraction ' either the same flower or a related seedling. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Lord Stanley (Storer).—Early, tall. Very good cup, but small; marked finely with rich brown on a good yellow ground. Good constitution and increases freely; 24 inches; May 12, 13 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Fig. 22 from the Report of the Tulip Nomenclataure Committee, 1914-15: Broken English Tulip – Sir Joseph Paxton.

Masterpiece (Slater).—Early; below medium height. Petals pointed and showing an awkward shoulder. Sometimes beautifully marked with black on a clear orange-yellow ground, but more generally it shows a good deal of indefinite brown splashes besides the black. Good constitution; increases freely; 20 inches; May 3,- 15 days.

Samuel Barlow (Storer).—Flamed with rich reddish-brown on a bright yellow ground. There are two strains, one lightly marked and showing a good deal of ground, the other richly pencilled and redder. Vigorous; increases rapidly. One of the very best; 20 inches; May 8, 17 days. See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

Image Caption: Figure 22: Broken English Tulip – 'Sir Joseph Paxton'. Click images for larger versions.

Sir Joseph Paxton (Willison) .—Beautifully marked with black and brown on a clear yellow ground; good shape and stands well; vigorous grower; 24 inches; May 8, 18 days. The best English tulip. A chance seedling from 'Trafalgar.' (Fig. 22.) See also under Surviving Broken Tulips section of this website.

 

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